• Journal on Rehabilitation of Torture Victims and Prevention of Torture
    Vol 30 No 1 (2020)

    Scientific contributions in this issue include presentation of a Complex Care Approach (CCA) for treatment of torture victims that integrates medical, psychological, psychosocial and existential elements from a holistic perspective, and apply it to an hypothetical paradigmatic case. A short scientific report presents a series of 40 cases of male victims of sexual torture in India with severe urological sequelae in defining the concept of parrilla torture and showing the interplay between medical and psychological sequels.

    This issue also includes a short research report that presents data from an early analysis of the safeguards in the medical examination of people detained in Catalonia (Spain) in the framework of civic protests. The analysis serves as a reminder that the ethical principles of the Istanbul Protocol must be respected in all circumstances. Their data evidences a request for more thorough investigation by the Spanish authorities.

    Conversion therapies are still common practice in many countries around the world as a recent IRCT report has shown. The Independent Forensic Expert Group (IFEG) has been working over the past two years on an analysis of these practices as a form of ill-treatment or torture. The reader will find a landmark document: the IFEG's latest Statement with the conclusions and recommendations to the international legal and medical communities.

    Johan Lansen, one of the great European figures of the 20th century in the work with torture survivors, from his own experience as a Holocaust survivor, passed away in November 2019. Torture Journal reprints, as a posthu- mous tribute, the article that he published in the Journal of Medical Ethics more than 15 years ago with personal reflections on the ethical dilemmas of working with perpetrators.

    This issue also presents the challenging path to criminalisation of torture and enforced disappearances in Thailand that has been ongoing for over a decade. The Special Suppression and Prevention and of Torture and Enforced Disappearance Bill, introduced in 2014 remains entangled in the Thai legislative process.

  • Torture Journal 29 (3) Journal on Rehabilitation of Torture Victims and Prevention of Torture
    Vol 29 No 3 (2019)

    This issue of the Torture Journal takes its focus on measuring torture rehabilitation processes and results. Scientific contributions on this subject include a measurement of rehabilitation outcomes with an instrument designed at the Marjorie Kovler Center in Chicago; a validation study examining diagnoses of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Complex Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (CPTSD) in refugee and torture survivor populations; and a study of gender-based violence in Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. 

    The issue also comprises an applied perspective on organizational development in torture rehabilitation programs and two letters to the editor addressing involvement of medical personnel in torture in Syria and a response to the concept of psychological torture. 

    Finally, Secretary-General of the International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims, Lisa Henry, and Chief Executive Officer of STARTTS Centre in Australia, Jorge Aroche, provide an open letter to the Torture Journal readers and a celebratory text of STARTTS' 30th anniversary respectively. 

    A corrigendum is added to correct the Editorial of Vol. 29 (2).

  • Torture Journal: Journal on Rehabilitation of Torture Victims and Prevention of Torture
    Vol 29 No 2 (2019)

    This issue of the Torture Journal examines sleep deprivation as a method of torture. The editorial proposes that intentionally forcing a person to have less than 6 hours of continuous, restful sleep must be considered a form of degrading treatment that could amount to cruel and inhuman treatment, and suggests that when daily sleep deprivation is intentionally prolonged in a sustained manner for three days or more, it should be considered as a form of torture in itself.

    The issue includes a review of the prohibition of sleep deprivation as torture or ill-treatment in international law and the text of a Protocol for Medico-Legal Documentation of Sleep Deprivation with an accompanying explanatory article covering the development and pilot testing of the Protocol. The section also includes a study carried out in Palestine, documenting the impact of sleep deprivation on a sample of Palestinian detainees. 

    The issue is further complemented by an epidemiological study on knowledge relating to torture amongst medical professionals in Tanzania and a case report from Australia exemplifying narratives of Tamil survivors of sexual violence. A Debate section that discusses the standing of the Istanbul Protocol through the case of Mr Firas Tbeish is also included. Finally, a book review and letter to the editor close the issue. 

  • Torture Journal: Journal on Rehabilitation of Torture Victims and Prevention of Torture
    Vol 29 No 1 (2019)

    This issue of the Torture Journal reveals new, innovative insights on torture documentation and rehabilitation approaches from leading academics and researchers globally. The focus of the latest issue is on forensic documentation of tortureThe issue explores documentation in detail regarding its strengths, limitations and innovative new ideas, such as documentation procedures among specific sub-groups. Fresh research and perspectives on sport-based rehabilitation, as well as other key topics, also comprise the issue.

  • Torture Journal: Journal on Rehabilitation of Torture Victims and Prevention of Torture
    Vol 28 No 3 (2018)

    This issue of the Torture Journal examines the impact of sexual torture (and other forms of torture) in diverse settings around the world and identifies innovative and culturally appropriate rehabilitation approaches. The issue includes a special section on sexual, gender-based and genderized torture. 

  • Torture Journal Issue 2018-2 published by the International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims. Special section: Forced migration and torture: challenges and solutions in rehabilitation and prevention Torture Journal: Journal on Rehabilitation of Torture Victims and Prevention of Torture
    Vol 28 No 2 (2018)

    Special section: Forced migration and torture: challenges and solutions in rehabilitation and prevention

    Forced migration leads to many challenges for rehabilitating torture victims. Challenges and solutions in the forced migration context are investigated and addressed in the latest informative issue of the Torture Journal. 

  • Torture Journal: Journal on Rehabilitation of Torture Victims and Prevention of Torture
    Vol 26 No 2 (2016)

    Long-running themes and previous research are given new life in this issue, Lilla Hárdi's last as Editor in Chief.

  • Torture Journal: Journal on Rehabilitation of Torture Victims and Prevention of Torture
    Vol 26 No 1 (2016)

    "In such a complex clinical landscape, influenced by a dizzying array of different social, psychological and environmental factors, how can a clinician know what treatment has the best outcome for a particular person or group? And, how can researchers identify areas and methods for research?"

    Lilla Hárdi, MD, Editor in Chief

    This issue of the Toture Journal grapples with these questions and others.