Brasiliana – Journal for Brazilian Studies is a dynamic, open access academic forum in which scholars from diverse disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences can publish their research and draw on scholarship within the interdisciplinary field of Brazilian Studies.

Centenary of Camoes Chair at King's College London & Portuguese Language and Culture Day

2019-12-04

Photo1.jpg

In May 2019, King's College London hosted an event celebrating the centenary of the Portuguese Camoes Chair, which was created in 1919. With the support of the Embassies of Brazil, Portugal, Angola, and Mozambique, the event also celebrated the International Day of Portuguese Language. The event included sessions introduced by ambassadors in which academics from King's College discussed Portuguese, Brazilian and Lusophone African Studies in the United Kingdom. It was followed by a musical performance and readings from Portuguese-speaking authors.

 

Vol 7 No 1 (2018): Vozes do Além

Brasiliana's dossier "Voices from Beyond" is devoted to dead figures in Brazilian literature and cinema, and raises the question about the protagonism and poetics of these particular figures. Death is a classic theme in literature and literary studies. From the medieval dance of death to the personified death as a typical Vanitas allegory of the Baroque period to the mystical longing for death of the lyrical ego in romanticism – speculative fiction, as well, is populated by ghosts, the dead and revenants, and the medium of film is hardly imaginable without the appearance of death and those who have awakened from the dead. Fascination with death links the various epochs, media, genres and cultures, and death as the most extreme borderline experience offers grounds for pondering metaphysical meaning as well as literary transgressions on the threshold between fiction and reality. But what about the case of the recalcitrant dead, i.e. those who violate the border between life and death? No less universal than the topic of death itself, the contradictory figure of the living dead is present in all cultures, inspiring fantasy, populating ghost and scary stories and haunting all literary genres whose contours it thus simultaneously challenges.

This issue was edited by Dr. Sarah Burnautzki, Dr. Ute Hermanns, and Janek Scholz.

Published: 2019-11-12

View All Issues

Brasiliana – Journal for Brazilian Studies is a dynamic academic forum in which scholars from diverse disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences can publish their research and draw on scholarship within the interdisciplinary field of Brazilian Studies in an open access platform.

For information on how to submit, click here.