Sustainable Recruitment: Individual Characteristics and Psychosocial Working Conditions Among Swedish Police Officers

Keywords: Health, Working Environment & Wellbeing, Learning & Competencies, Organization & Management

Abstract

Selection research has typically focused on how to identify suitable candidates, while less is known regarding the long-term effects of various selection factors once the suitable candidates have start- ed working.The overall aim of this study was to examine the relative importance of selection fac- tors (measured during recruitment), and psychosocial working conditions (once candidates started working) for four outcomes, namely (1) job satisfaction, (2) organizational citizenship behavior, (3) occupational retention, and (4) health. Data came from a longitudinal study of newly hiredpolice officers in Sweden (N = 508), including recruitment data and a follow-up after 3.5 years.Results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed that psychosocial working conditionswere more important than selection factors in predicting the four outcomes.The findings suggestthat employers, to ensure sustainability, need to focus on activities that facilitate newcomers’ enter- ing in the organization and their professions by providing a sound work climate

Author Biographies

Stefan Annell, Stockholm University

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PhD/Post doc researcher, Department of Psychology. E-mail: stefan.annell@psychology.su.se

Petra Lindfors, Stockholm University

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Professor, Department of Psychology

Göran Kecklund, Stockholm University

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Professor, Stress Research Institute

Magnus Sverke, Stockholm University

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Professor, Department of Psychology

Published
2019-01-10
How to Cite
Annell, S., Lindfors, P., Kecklund, G., & Sverke, M. (2019). Sustainable Recruitment: Individual Characteristics and Psychosocial Working Conditions Among Swedish Police Officers. Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, 8(4). https://doi.org/10.18291/njwls.v8i4.111926
Section
Articles