Torture by administration of electric shocks: The case of PG

Authors

  • Clifford Liu Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
  • Jennifer Weintraub Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
  • Matina Weintraub Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.7146/torture.v32i3.129471

Keywords:

forensic, electrical, torture

Abstract

In this case study, a survivor of torture describes a history of electrical torture with a rod-like object and the subsequent neurological symptoms and keloid scars that developed afterwards. Electrical injuries can be difficult for a clinician to identify on exam as they do not often leave any physical scars on the skin. However, survivors of electrical injuries do describe a constellation of acute sensations and ensuing neurologic and musculoskeletal symptoms that can be recognized by taking a detailed history. Familiarity with the mechanism of these injuries and their common acute and subacute symptoms can assist a forensic examiner in evaluating consistency in these cases.

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Published

2021-12-29

How to Cite

Liu, C., Weintraub, J. ., & Weintraub, M. (2021). Torture by administration of electric shocks: The case of PG. Torture Journal, 31(3), 113–116. https://doi.org/10.7146/torture.v32i3.129471