‘Barbarous cruelty at the British Museum’: mediatization, authority, and reputation in nineteenth-century England

  • Allison Cavanagh University of Leeds
Keywords: mediatization, media history, reputation, nineteenth century

Abstract

This article considers the usefulness of mediatization theories in historical studies of the media. Using a series of letters published in the UK newspaper The Times between 1885 and 1886 as an example, the article examines the way in which processes of mediatization developed alongside the institutions of social and cultural power by which they were reflexively constituted. On the basis of Hjarvard’s distinction between direct and indirect forms of mediatization, the paper looks at the ways in which the enunciation of moral authority and personal reputation were transformed by their incorporation into mediatized culture. At the same time, it is argued that mediatization is not a standalone process but is, rather, part of a wider set of social processes. The article reflects on the contribution of mediatization theories to developing a rounded picture of media history.

Author Biography

Allison Cavanagh, University of Leeds

Lecturer in Communications Studies,

Institute of Communications Studies

Published
2013-06-28
How to Cite
Cavanagh, A. (2013). ‘Barbarous cruelty at the British Museum’: mediatization, authority, and reputation in nineteenth-century England. MedieKultur: Journal of Media and Communication Research, 29(54), 17 p. https://doi.org/10.7146/mediekultur.v29i54.7280
Section
Articles: Theme section