El génesis de la cultura represiva de México Moctezuma y Hernán Cortés - Los gemelos malditos -

  • Juan Herrera Carlos

Abstract

The essay analyses the corrupted and oppressive culture in Mexico, whose origins,
according to the presented hypothesis, is the defeat of the Aztecs by Hernan Cortes. The
characteristics of this culture were determined by the personal interests of the
conquistadores, their customs, and their duties to the crown of Spain, as well as the reaction
of the defeated: to the destruction of the best of the civilisations of the Anáhuac, was added
the worse of the Spanish culture. As a result, during several centuries, the Spanish have
promulgated the propaganda of the “civilisation of the Indians”, when they themselves and
their descendants, were not at all prepared or capacitated to civilise anybody, and the forced
Christianization was rather a pacification of the Indians, leaving the new society
(authorities, church and population) in a social, economic and political stagnation. Cultural
forms that still hold back the development of the country.

References

Carlos, J. H. (2014) La sociedad mexicana: las reglas de cada uno. (Ensayo no
publicado).
Morishima, Michio (1994) Why Has Japan Succeeded? – Western Technology And
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Nietzsche, F. (2012) Frederich Nietzsche & Antikken. Tre ungdomstekster.
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Paz, Octavio (1976) El laberinto de la soledad. México D.F.: Fondo de Cultura
Económica.
Plutarch, (2005) Fall Of The Roman Republic. UK: Penguin Books.
Ramos, Samuel (1976) El perfil del hombre y la cultura en México. Espasa-Calpe
Mexicana S. A.
Rousseau, J. J. (2007) The Social Contract - And Other Later Political Writings.
Cambridge University Press.
Sierra, Justo (2003) Evolución poítica del pueblo mexicano. Biblioteca Ayacucho;
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Published
2015-07-24
How to Cite
Carlos, J. (2015). El génesis de la cultura represiva de México Moctezuma y Hernán Cortés - Los gemelos malditos -. Diálogos Latinoamericanos, 16(24), 14. Retrieved from https://tidsskrift.dk/dialogos/article/view/113056
Section
Articles