Social Interaction. Video-Based Studies of Human Sociality https://tidsskrift.dk/socialinteraction <p><em>Social Interaction. Video-Based Studies of Human Sociality</em> is dedicated to studying action and sense-making practices in social interaction. It focuses typically on workplace settings and their constitutive features as made visible through participants’ conduct and the social organization of the setting. The journal welcomes scholarly papers that provide new insights through state of the art research of naturally occurring human action as situated in the material world. Papers will typically analyze how participants draw on bodily, tangible, vocal, verbal and other resources to make sense and accomplish orderly courses of social interaction.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Department of Nordic Studies and Linguistics University of Copenhagen en-US Social Interaction. Video-Based Studies of Human Sociality 2446-3620 <p><img width="265" height="93" alt="" src="https://ojs3.statsbiblioteket.dk/public/site/images/bdue/Skærmbillede_2017-05-22_kl._09_.50_.57_.png">&nbsp;<br>We follow the <a href="http://www.budapestopenaccessinitiative.org/read" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Budapest Open Access Initiative's definition of Open Access</a>.</p> <p>The journal allows the author(s) to hold the copyright without restrictions.<br>The journal allow software/spiders to automatically crawl the journal content (also known as text mining)<br>The journal provide article level metadata to DOAJ<br>The journal allow readers to read, download, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of its articles and allow readers to use them for any other lawful purpose.</p> Editorial, Vol 1, issue 2 https://tidsskrift.dk/socialinteraction/article/view/110477 <p>Welcome to the 2<sup>nd</sup> issue of <em>Social Interaction. Video-Based Studies of Human Sociality</em>.</p> Kristian Mortensen Brian Due ##submission.copyrightStatement## http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2018-10-30 2018-10-30 1 2 10.7146/si.v1i2.110477 Objectivation practices https://tidsskrift.dk/socialinteraction/article/view/110037 <p><em style="box-sizing: inherit; caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; font-family: Helvetica, serif; font-size: 14.666666984558105px; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: justify; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration: none;"><span style="box-sizing: inherit; font-family: Helvetica;" lang="EN-GB">Linkages between the early interactionist sociology of Simmel and Garfinkel’s ethnomethodology are explored, using illustrations drawn from the author’s research on coffee tasting, the debates of Tibetan scholar-monks, and players of board games. Garfinkel’s inquiries into the neglected objectivity of social facts are specified with concrete illustrations, and a model is developed to guide the investigation of some seminal topics in ethnomethodology. Discounting rational choice theory, voluntarism, and individualist models, this study offers an account of the objectivation practices that parties routinely employ when they collaborate in setting up an orderliness for their local affairs.</span></em></p> Kenneth Liberman ##submission.copyrightStatement## http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2018-10-24 2018-10-24 1 2 10.7146/si.v1i2.110037 Why multimodality? Why co-operative action? Keynote presentation at the Copenhagen Multimodality Day 2017 https://tidsskrift.dk/socialinteraction/article/view/110394 <p>Video of key note talk from Copenhange Multimodality Day 2017</p> Charles Goodwin ##submission.copyrightStatement## http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2018-10-27 2018-10-27 1 2 10.7146/si.v1i2.110394 Why Multimodality? Why Co-Operative Action? (transcribed by J. Philipsen) https://tidsskrift.dk/socialinteraction/article/view/110039 <p><span style="box-sizing: inherit; caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration: none; font-size: 10pt; line-height: 20px; font-family: Helvetica;" lang="EN-US">This paper is based on a keynote presentation by Charles Goodwin at the 3rd Multimodality Day conference in Copenhagen, Oct 2017. He started the talk in the following way: “</span><span style="box-sizing: inherit; caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration: none; font-size: 10pt; line-height: 20px;" lang="EN-US">Just one thing I want to say before I begin: it is an honor and a pleasure to have spend my life in this field and this community. Doing work that is not trying to make machines of war but to try to find out what it is to be human. And the other side is that I feel very strongly that one of the best things about our lives is that we are in the midst of these intergenerational transmission processes. And one of the great things for me has been all the students and all the colleagues I have had, and the opportunity to share these things.”</span></p> Charles Goodwin ##submission.copyrightStatement## http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2018-10-24 2018-10-24 1 2 10.7146/si.v1i2.110039 A preference for non-invasive touch in caregiving contexts https://tidsskrift.dk/socialinteraction/article/view/110019 <p><em style="box-sizing: inherit; caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 14.666666984558105px; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: justify; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration: none;"><span style="box-sizing: inherit; font-family: Helvetica;" lang="EN-GB">This article analyses how a professional caregiver uses touch as a key resource when instructing and guiding a person with Parkinson’s disease. Touch is shown to have both facilitating and controlling functions in the accomplishment of everyday tasks in residential care. We find an orientation to touch as a sensitive action, invading the patient’s intimacy and right to self-determination. First, the semiotic resources occur in a successive order, where touch often occurs only when a verbal or gestural action has failed. Second, less invasive kinds of touch, such as patting, precede more invasive kinds, such as holding and shoving.</span></em></p> Ann Katrine Marstrand Jan Svennevig ##submission.copyrightStatement## http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2018-10-23 2018-10-23 1 2 10.7146/si.v1i2.110019 Passing Glasses https://tidsskrift.dk/socialinteraction/article/view/110020 <p><em style="box-sizing: inherit; caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration: none;"><span style="box-sizing: inherit; font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif;" lang="EN-GB">Passing an object is an everyday action with which most people are familiar. It involves detailed organizations of the body within a spatial and material setting. One place where objects are continuously passed is at the optician. Based on more than 700 hours of video recordings at 11 Danish opticians, this article shows how passing glasses is accomplished in an institutional context where the optician is interactionally constructed as responsible for securing the safe passing and avoiding the (problematic) drop. The paper contributes to EMCA studies on passings by showing how these actions may display deontic responsibilities, and how the passings are accomplished mainly by the optician using a specific grip, relying on tactile experiences, constantly monitoring the customer behaviour, and embodily anticipating next actions. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></em></p> Brian Lystgaard Due Johan Trærup ##submission.copyrightStatement## http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2018-10-23 2018-10-23 1 2 10.7146/si.v1i2.110020