• Machine Feeling Machine Feeling
    Vol 8 No 1 (2019)

    Digital culture has become instrumental for capturing and managing what Raymond Williams would once have called “structures of feeling”. The journal issue A Peer-Reviewed Journal About Machine Feeling alludes to this, and points to a material analysis of aesthetics and culture, including its technical and social forms, and in the way that this concept was originally employed as an acknowledgment of the importance of the hard to capture dimensions of everyday life. What potential new sensibilities and structures of feeling may arise in such normalized registers of our habits? What new cultural and social forms and practices emerge in the coming together of machine learning and structures of feeling? In each their own way, the authors in this journal explore these questions.

  • Research Values Research Values
    Vol 7 No 1 (2018)

    A Peer-Reviewed Journal About Research Values interrogates value and values in ways that respond to techno-cultural shifts and embrace the range of economies that pervade digital culture. These include facing value and modes of subjectivation involved in both the sharing economy as well as in the use of biometrics; knowing values and the different ways of storing and regulating knowledge; activating values and the ways artists and activists may potentially address the conflation ofvalues and value in terms of cultural politics; and finally changing values to explore how processes of valuing and valorization seem to bend and evade fundamental relations to the world.

  • Machine Research
    Vol 6 No 1 (2017)

    This publication is about Machine Research – research on machines, research with machines, and research as a machine. It thus explores machinic perspectives to suggest a situation where the humanities are put into a critical perspective by machine driven ecologies, ontologies and epistemologies of thinking and acting. It aims to engage research and artistic practice that takes into account the new materialist conditions implied by nonhuman techno-ecologies. Articles include new ontologies and intelligence such as machine learning, machine reading and listening, systems-oriented perspectives to broadcast communication and conflict, the ethics and aesthetics of autonomous systems, and other post-anthropocentric reconsiderations of materiality and infrastructure.

  • Excessive Research
    Vol 5 No 1 (2016)

    Excessive Research highlights the compulsive actions of digital culture, and how we are constantly encouraged to stay active, to make, to share and to secure. While idealised by hackers, these actions are at the same time the conveyors of new agile innovation strategies, and modes of economic and symbolic exchange. A culture of sharing, for instance, is evidently one of the most fetishised activities of the network and describes how value is now created. ‘Sharing is caring’, goes the catchphrase, but by its inclination of excess, loss and indebtedness, sharing also challenges the very logic of accumulation, and hence it must be domesticated and normalised. Articles delve into the nature of these actions and their limits, asking: What happens when research is less about exchange and more about excess?

  • Datafied Research
    Vol 4 No 1 (2015)

    This issue of APRJA examines the implications of datafication for research.  The articles provide responses that outsmart and outplay the logic of capturing everything applied by the corporate as well as scientific communities. Each in their own way they address the complexity af 'capture', and examine datafication’s connection to commodification (and even to zombification), and examine alternatives such as obfuscation in order to know and unknow things at different registers and scales – from the grain of data to big data, the materiality of data and the politics of data structures, or in other ways afforded by emergent practices of datafied research. 

  • Post-digital Research
    Vol 3 No 1 (2014)

    Although in many ways the post-digital “sucks but is useful” as Florian Cramer notes in his contribution, this issue of A Peer-Reviewed Journal About Post-Digital Research takes it to be a serious concept that deserves our critical attention. The journal issue is divided into three sections, that address the term itself, its genealogy and wider connotations, as well as its potential usefulness across different fields (including art, acoustics, aesthetic theory, political economy and philosophy). Given that the term comes from practice, it also addresses how the post-digital potentially operates as a framework for practice-based research that relate to material and historical conditions.